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Anelka Argiro

Anelka’s office is situated on a somewhat quiet street that sits between Chelsea and Midtown. It’s a neighborhood that is home to many PR groups, advertising agencies, and record labels in Manhattan. Her office is one of a handful of rooms that are sectioned off from the bullpen that comprises the rest of Wind Up Records. Her walls are bare, and her office is neat...but there’s a presence that is undeniably larger than anything else on her desk.

“Post-its keep me productive. I have to keep everything in front of me,” Argiro says, as she proudly looks over her post-it empire. They’re all over her desk and scattered over bulletin boards. On any given day, post-its help keep Argiro organized as the very productive team of one that she is, particularly because she works with about 200 different artists.

A big focus for Argiro at Wind Up is to assist emerging artists with brand partnerships, humanizing and empowering them beyond their function as musicians. Argiro’s passion for music is clear in how hard she works to ensure that artists and brands share values that can evolve into a mutually beneficial relationship. But that passion goes further than just her daily work and the world that she's a part of. It gives her a uniquely eclectic and critical understanding of music and sound and how they resonate with people at large.

“One of the trends we spotted was this idea of mass personalization—that’s what Here offers. Sound, completely tailored to what you want.”

The key is ensuring that artists and brands align in an authentic way—a holistic partnership that’s about more than just the music on one end and what the brand wants on the other. In many ways, Argiro work aligning music business and her clients parallels what Here offers to people’s ears in live music environments. Both foster a relationship that is rooted in personifying an experience and adding human feeling.

Argiro started on a couple of different paths before eventually landing in the music world, including a job in fashion trend forecasting. “Forecasting is based on a consumer mindset, and you have to take a global approach and really see everything—art, music, political and economic landscape, how people as a society are changing and shifting—and that’s when you start to see patterns emerge around the globe,” Argiro says. “I think that’s the exciting part of Here...relating back to the trend forecasting and macro level takeaways, I started to see how things would percolate through different industries. One of the trends we spotted was this idea of mass personalization. That’s what Here offers. Sound, completely tailored to what you want.”

“I sometimes joke that ‘it’s just music—we’re not saving lives’ but maybe sound and music are, in fact, helping save lives.”

It also comes as no surprise that she thinks outside the box when asked about the greatest innovation in sound today. “People in medical fields are using sound wave technology to help identify and track cancer cells. I sometimes joke that ‘It’s just music—we’re not saving lives’ but maybe sound and music are, in fact, helping save lives.”

“The band knows what they want you to hear, but once they’re on stage, unfortunately, they can’t really control what you’re hearing.”

Sound innovation today furthers the relationship between those making the music and those actually listening. There are involuntary sounds, but then there are also chosen sounds—live concerts, scenes where the sound is made with intention. Those sounds are what shape so many different experiences, and Argiro knows that means something very specific when it comes to Here. “This is about what the experience is for you. You’re getting what you want out of whatever experience you’re a part of, tailoring it to what you want, not the sound guy’s preferences, or not necessarily what the band wants you to hear at that moment. The band knows what they want you to hear, but once they’re on stage, unfortunately, they can’t really control what you’re hearing. That’s one of the most frustrating elements for artists,” Argiro says. “If people can know what [the sound] is going to be like, they can go to the show and adjust as they would like it. It’s very empowering.” For her, Here offers empowerment that fosters a closer relationship between artists and listeners in an authentic way, where everyone can get what they want. Personalization at its core is no longer just one-sided from music maker, to listener, but a collaboration from both sides.


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